1. Ferguson Family Home, 1900

Above: The Ferguson Family Home, c.1900 A photograph from the family album credited to Ivy Ferguson.

One of the Ferguson family stories passed down to the living descendants is that Ivy Ferguson was an amateur photographer and family members credit her for this month’s deteriorated, but still a gem, taken of the family home, celebrating a recent snowfall.

Ivy (sometimes spelled “Ivie” even “Ivia”), was the middle child of E. C. and Lucetta Ferguson. Her father, Emory Canda, was often referred to as the “father of Snohomish,” in his lifetime, which means that Ivy, along with her older sister Sylvia and younger brother Cecil, could be referred to as “the first family of Snohomish.”

2014-02_nowNow: Apartments at 214 Maple Avenue.
The site of their family home is today the location of the Snohomish Aquatic Center.

North of the gracious home, its southern face appearing rather ghostly in Ivy’s photo, was the farm, labeled as “The Ranch” in the family album. (If any readers know when most of the Ferguson’s thirty-two acre farm passed on to the school district, please let me know.)

That’s Ferguson Creek flowing into the bottom frame of the historic photo. It’s called “Swifty Creek” today, and it flows into a culvert at the east end of the sports field, emerging for several blocks at Fifth Street, before going underground again all the way to the Snohomish River. This course of outflow from Blackman Lake created the infamous Snohomish Gulch that I have written about in the past.

ferguson familyRight: Ivy Ferguson, c.1890 (click to enlarge)

Ivy, a single woman in her late twenties, moved to Olympia for a position as a stenographer with the state insurance company. Returning to Snohomish for a visit, Ivy died “after an illness of a few days” on July 22, 1912, in the family home. She was only 37 years old.

At the time of her death, we imagine that the Ferguson family home looked pretty much the same as when Ivy captured it with her camera after a light snowfall.

. . . .

Published in the Snohomish County Tribune, January 15, 2014

  • warnerblake

    via email from Bruce Ferguson with my thanks: ” I remember Gary and I using a small raft on the creek. Back in the mid 50’s, a small saw mill could found here. The “3-S” railroad [owned by E.C.], ran along the back side or north side of his property. The right-of-way is the path we see today. [but you already knew this]. This is the first time I’ve seen this picture. As a kid, this was a short cut going or returning to/from the cannery. The barn and a couple of out buildings were still standing then. [nice barn]. I believe I have two or three glass film plates somewhere. I’ll try and find them. I assume they were made by Ivy [?].

    I believe Dist. #201 bought this parcel in 1957 or 1958. From Norman Lenfest, my Dad’s uncle.”